Today in Milligan History (2/20)

Today in Milligan History

an ongoing project of Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society

Good Day, Milligan!

Proverbs 20:13 – Do not love sleep or you will grow poor; stay awake and you will have food to spare.

This is Wednesday, February 20, 2013, and on this day in Milligan history . . .

1959    Dr. William A. Ward, Assistant Professor of Humanities at Milligan College, read a paper to the Tennessee Philological Association at its annual meeting on the Vanderbilt University campus. “Evidence of an Eastern Mediterranean Vocabulary in the Pre-Classical Age.” The Mill-Agenda, Vol. 8, No. 6, January-February 1959.

2012    President Bill Greer (1985; Milligan since 1994; president since 2011) invited the Milligan College community to join him in congratulating Vice President for Enrollment Management and Marketing Lee Fierbaugh (1994, Milligan since 1994) in successfully defending her dissertation, earning an Ed.D. in Higher Education Leadership and Management from Regent University. Campus-wide e-mail from Bill Greer, February 20, 2012

Birthdays: In 1805 Angelina Grimke in Boston, MA . . . in 1808 Honoré Daumier in Marseille . . . in 1927 Sidney Poitier in Miami, FL . . .  in 1941 Buffy Sainte-Marie in the Qu’Appelle Valley, Saskatchewan . . .  in 1991 Milligan College senior Jack Ambers Quisenberry . . . and in 1992 junior Matthew Griffith Rees in Ypsilanti, MI.

Elsewhere:

In 1792 President George Washington signed the Postal Service Act.

In 1816 Rossini’s opera The Barber of Seville premiered in Rome.

In 1878, following the death of Pius IX, Italian cardinal Gioacchino Pecci, 67, was elected Pope Leo XIII.

In 1952 Major League Baseball certified the first African American umpire, Emmett Ashford.

In 1962 John Glenn orbited the earth three times in 4 hours, 55 minutes, the first American in orbital space.

In 1992 Texas millionaire businessman Ross Perot announced on the Larry King Show that he would run for the Presidency of the United States of America.

This is what, in the journalism business, they call a “slow news day.”  Certainly more things have happened on February 20 than Phi Alpha Theta has yet uncovered.  Do you know of something? Drop a note to phialphatheta@milligan.edu.

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