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Today in Milligan History (10/30)

Today in Milligan History

an ongoing project of Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society

 

Good day, Milligan!

Proverbs 30:11-13 – There are those who curse their fathers  and do not bless their mothers;
those who are pure in their own eyes and yet are not cleansed of their filth;  those whose eyes are ever so haughty, whose glances are so disdainful . . . .

This is Wednesday, October 30, 2013, and on this day in Milligan history . . . 

 

1938    Orson Wells made his now (in)famous radio broadcast of “War of the Worlds,” which depicted an invasion of the earth by creatures from Mars. So realistic was the drama that radio audiences around the country became anxious, not realizing that they were listening to science fiction. At Milligan College, too, students reportedly fell under the spell.  David “Red” Mason (1940) was a member of the National Guard, and was alarmed to hear that of 7000 guardsmen in New Jersey only 129 had survived. With every knock on his Pardee Hall dormitory door, he expected a summons to join his guard unit in Elizabethton. The Stampede reported that US Army veteran Steve Shelton (1938) dug out his puttees in anticipation of a call to arms. “Bo” Brummit was ready to pack up and go to Erwin, preferring to die in the hills of home.  The Stampede: “At the height of the confusion, an unknown freshman shouted “Hotziggedy, now we won’t have nine-week exams!”  The paper mused, the broadcasting event “shows us just how modern the world has become. A national catastrophe can now be broadcast all over the world, seconds after it happens. Worldwide mobilization can be started in a matter of minutes, if there should be a common enemy. . . .”  The Stampede, November 12, 1938 p. 4, “Mars vs. Milligan.”

 

Birthdays: In 1735 John Adams in Braintree, MA . . . in 1821 Feodor Dostoevski  in Moscow, Russia. . . in 1885 Ezra Pound in Hailey, ID . . .  in 1918 Boston Red Sox baseball great Ted Williams in San Diego, CA.

 

Elsewhere . . .

In 1452 Johannes Guttenberg of Mainz, Germany, brought a Latin Bible off his movable-type printing press.

In 1791 Mozart’s opera The Magic Flute premiered in Vienna.

In 1935 George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess opened at the Colonial Theatre in Boston.

In 1955 actor James Dean died from injuries suffered in a car crash near Cholame, CA.

In 1966 Nazi war criminals Albert Speer and Baldur von Schirach were released from Berlin’s Spandau Prison after serving 20 years.

In 1982 Cheers premiered.

In 1999 Coach Steve Spurrier won his 100th game with the University of Florida football team, a 30-14 victory against Georgia. He was the only coach in the 20th century to win 100 games in his first 10 years at a school. Spurrier grew up in Johnson City.

 

Do you know something that happened on this day in Milligan history?  Is this the birthday of a Milligan personality?  The anniversary of a Milligan event?  If so, send it to Phi Alpha Theta at phialphatheta@milligan.edu.